How President Trump’s Tweets Hurt His Travel Ban

How President Trump’s Tweets Hurt His Travel Ban

President Trump’s twitter page has been a major focus of his time in office thus far, stirring up a lot of attention from the media and the public. In early June, tweets regarding his revised immigration executive order drew attention that I believe will only do harm to his defense of the “travel ban”. Quite simply, he may have shot himself in the legal foot here.

Read the full article on Time.com, here: http://time.com/4805973/travel-ban-supreme-court-donald-trump-tweets/.

9th Circuit presses Trump admin on legality of travel ban

9th Circuit presses Trump admin on legality of travel ban

CNN discusses why Donald Trump’s travel ban executive order is up for another round of debate with the 9th Circuit. 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals has also been tapped to make a decision. No matter how the two courts rule, I predict this case will go to the Supreme Court; the issue is too important to pass up.

 

Read the whole analysis with CNN.

Trump’s Quiet Reversal on Deporting Young Undocumented Immigrants

Trump’s Quiet Reversal on Deporting Young Undocumented Immigrants

I spoke with Priscilla Alvarez about DACA students being deported for leaving United States. Although Trump has not immediately axed the DACA program as he pledged, DACA recipients are still at risk of being deported. Without advanced permission, known as advance parole, leaving the country is effectively abandoned DACA status. If DACA holders return, they are returning illegally and can be subject to deportation proceedings.

Visit The Atlantic to read the full analysis of the Trump administration’s actions related to the DACA program.

Donald Trump signs executive order to reform H-1B visas

Al Jazeera reports on Trump’s “Buy American, Hire American” executive order demanding changes to the H-1B visa program. However, this executive order is an overly simple solution to a complex problem, and it limiting temporary work visas to boost US employment rates could have the opposite effect.

 

Immigrants account for a disproportionately large share of start-ups and patents in the United States, and for every H-1B position requested, U.S. tech companies increase their employment by five workers. Cutting the H-1B program pushes talented immigrants to look elsewhere, and this administration risks hurting the U.S. economy by accelerating the existing problem of off-shoring work and talent to other countries.