China Daily: Spending bill likely to extend EB-5 program again

China Daily: Spending bill likely to extend EB-5 program again

I spoke with China Daily on March 21 discussing the possibility of an EB-5 extension in the coming week.

“It’s expected that Congress will approve another clean extension (meaning no changes) to the current EB-5 program until September 30,” Cornell University law professor Stephen Yale-Loehr said in an interview on Tuesday.

“The investment minimums for the program would have increased from $500,000 and $1 million to $925,000 and a little over $1 million,” said Yale-Loehr. He added that a job creation requirement also would have increased to nine (for $925,000) and 12 (for more than $1 million).

In the end, the prognosis for action (on EB-5) is slim to none. It’s hard to get Congress to do anything that is controversial, especially with the mid-term elections approaching.

The article, by Paul Welitzkin, can be accessed here: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201803/21/WS5ab267f5a3106e7dcc14547c.html

 

CNN, LA Times, and more: Supreme Court detention case, latest on DACA

CNN, LA Times, and more: Supreme Court detention case, latest on DACA

TIME: When Does DACA Expire? The Supreme Court Just Gave Dreamers More Time

TIME: When Does DACA Expire? The Supreme Court Just Gave Dreamers More Time

On February 26, the Supreme Court ruled to reinstate the DACA program, overruling a March 5 deadline set by the Trump administration for Congress to decide on the fate of the program.

I was quoted in the article, here:

The Supreme Court’s order and the previous judicial rulings keep the Trump administration from ending the program on March 5, but around 100 DACA recipients have been losing their work permits and deportation deferrals every day, notes Cornell Law professor Stephen Yale-Loehr. “The uncertainty is causing problems for both DACA recipients and their employers,” he said. “Today’s ruling throws the DACA program back into Congress’ lap.”

View the article on TIME.com, here: http://time.com/5175496/supreme-court-daca-dreamers-deadline/

New York Times: Activist entitled to ‘freedom to say goodbye,’ judge rules

New York Times: Activist entitled to ‘freedom to say goodbye,’ judge rules

On Jan. 29, a Federal District Court judge in Manhattan ordered the release of Ravi Ragbir, an immigrant rights activist. The judge ruled Ragbir’s Jan. 11 detention “unconstitutional and cruel”. Judge Katherine B. Forrest says the activist should have been entitled to “the freedom to say goodbye”.

Stephen Yale-Loehr, a professor at Cornell Law School, called the decision “groundbreaking.” He said, “It holds that the Constitution requires the government to give people subject to a final deportation order time to arrange their affairs.”

But Mr. Yale-Loehr cautioned: “Today’s decision was long on rhetoric and short on careful legal analysis. I worry that a higher court may reverse.”

The full article is here: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/29/nyregion/judge-released-immigrant-ragbir.html

CBS News: Trump says visa lottery rewards the “worst” immigrants. That’s inaccurate.

CBS News: Trump says visa lottery rewards the “worst” immigrants. That’s inaccurate.

My December 18 op-ed on Trump’s claims that the diversity visa program lets in the worst was quoted in a CBS News article on January 10. Trump has gone on to say that foreign countries are contributing to the lottery the “people they don’t want”.

“There is no way a foreign government can game the lottery to offload the worst of their citizenry,” Yale-Loehr writes. “Applicants who commit fraud, say by applying more than once each year to increase their chances of winning, are barred from the program. The State Department has issued specific warnings against fraud in the diversity visa program. So even if a government tried to game the lottery, it should be caught.”

The article can be accessed here.

TIME: Donald Trump to end protected status for Salvadorians

TIME: Donald Trump to end protected status for Salvadorians

I spoke with TIME about Trump’s call to end temporary protected status (TPS) for El Salvador. Although the program is temporary in nature, it has been renewed by presidential administrations ever 18 months since 2001.

Cornell Law Professor Stephen Yale-Loehr told TIME in November that presidents have typically maintained [TPS] status because ending it could pose a political challenge.

“Individuals from those countries settle here, they have roots, they marry U.S. citizens, they have U.S. citizen children,” he said. “So if you take it away then you’re dividing families and sending some people back to their home country.”

The full article is here.