Trump vetting review could lead to ‘backdoor’ travel ban

Trump vetting review could lead to ‘backdoor’ travel ban

I was quoted in a USA Today article on President Trump’s extreme vetting efforts. I said some countries willing to cooperate with new visa vetting procedures may not have the technological capabilities the U.S. demands, and that the U.S. should be realistic in assessing what kind of information and the quality of information they are receiving from other countries.

The full article is available here.

Cornell faculty panelists discuss immigration reform in America

Cornell faculty panelists discuss immigration reform in America

I joined fellow Cornell faculty members on a panel addressing immigration issues under the new administration. We received many audience questions on current policies and the complications of migrating to the U.S. and crossing its borders.

In response to one question, I stated the courts rather than Congress might intervene on immigration policy changes and limits to the number of refugees admitted to the U.S., but the president could enact other measures. For example, the State Department has a new form for visa applicants with questions about their recent social media usage and travel in the last 15 years.

In response to questions about the President’s mission to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border, my fellow panelist, Garcia-Rios, a native of Durango, Mexico, contributed that, “we see a binational dynamic at the border”. During his first year at the University of Texas, El Paso, and after moving to El Paso he would often cross back and forth across the border to Mexico to visit family and friends or for a meal.

“Now I see a change that is more restrictive. A community that used to be binational is disrupted,” he said.

“We already effectively have a wall, just not a physical wall,” I added.

 

Read the article in the Cornell Chronicle, here.

Trump’s Own Tweets Help Kill His Government’s Travel Ban, Again

Trump’s Own Tweets Help Kill His Government’s Travel Ban, Again

I commented again on President Trump’s travel ban tweets and their negative effect defending his legislation. For the second time, the President’s own comments have aided the courts in knocking down his executive order.

Fortune covers this issue in the article, here.

U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals refuses to reinstate Trump’s travel ban

U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals refuses to reinstate Trump’s travel ban

I was quoted in an LA Times article about the 9th circuit’s refusal to reinstate Trump’s travel ban. I stated the Supreme Court might find it easier to reject the travel ban based on a violation of existing law rather than constitutional grounds.  “It is always hard to win an immigration case on constitutional grounds in the Supreme Court because immigration touches on foreign relations and national sovereignty issues. People outside the United States also generally don’t have U.S. constitutional rights. The combination of the two rulings provides a one-two punch against the executive order that will make it harder for the administration to win at the Supreme Court.”

The LA Times article is here.

Trump pressing ahead with ‘extreme vetting’ in spite of court battles

Trump pressing ahead with ‘extreme vetting’ in spite of court battles

“This form simply puts into writing questions that consular officials could have and may have asked visa applicants before to determine whether they should be admitted to the United States,” said Stephen Yale-Loehr, a professor of immigration law at Cornell Law School.

At the very least, Yale-Loehr said he expects the new form will be used to delay – and possibly deny – visa applications while Trump’s travel ban languishes in court.

“We’ll have to see over time whether, as applied, it seems that certain groups of people are being denied visas because of this form,” he said.

View the full article from The Guardian here.