Forbes & Financial Times on the Supreme Court Travel Ban Decision

Forbes & Financial Times on the Supreme Court Travel Ban Decision

On June 26, 2018, the Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision that the Trump administration’s decision to ban the entry of individuals from a group of primarily Muslim countries was constitutional, stating it is within the scope of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

In the wake of the decision I spoke with numerous media, including a Q&A with Forbes discussing the implications of the ruling. That interview can be read here: https://www.forbes.com/sites/stuartanderson/2018/06/27/the-travel-ban-decision-how-bad-for-immigration-policy/#54c1e1e05a81.

I also spoke with Financial Times regarding the unsurprising nature of the decision: https://www.ft.com/content/18cd1f96-794c-11e8-8e67-1e1a0846c475.

New York Times: U.S. Must Keep DACA and Accept New Applications, Federal Judge Rules

New York Times: U.S. Must Keep DACA and Accept New Applications, Federal Judge Rules

On April 24 a federal judge ruled to keep DACA and that the government must resume accepting new applications. The ruling is a major setback to the Trump administration’s efforts to eliminate DACA in a series of immigration cuts.

Stephen Yale-Loehr, a professor of immigration law at Cornell Law School, said that Judge Bates’s ruling, if upheld on appeal, would “benefit tens of thousands of Dreamers.”

Read the article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/24/us/daca-dreamers-trump.html

State Department’s New Social Media Rules for Visa Applicants

State Department’s New Social Media Rules for Visa Applicants

I was quoted in two publications about the State Department’s new proposed requirement for visa applicants to disclose their social media usage for the last five years.

On March 31, I spoke with Quartz on how the new rules are a method for the Trump administration to limit immigration without going to Congress. That article can be found here: https://qz.com/1241916/the-us-just-found-a-new-way-to-delay-visa-applications/.

On April 2, I spoke with the Vietnamese publication Tuoi Tre. The article is here: https://tuoitre.vn/vao-my-phai-khai-tai-khoan-mang-xa-hoi-tranh-cai-kich-liet-2018040210451972.htm.

Times of India: Indian H-1B filings set to drop by 50% this year

Times of India: Indian H-1B filings set to drop by 50% this year

I was quoted in the Times of India on April 4 regarding H-1B filings.

“H-1B visa rejection rates, including for renewals, have risen markedly. Stephen Yale-Loehr, professor of immigration law practice at Cornell Law School, said the number of H-1B petitions that received requests for additional evidence last year increased more than 40% over the previous year. “That trend is likely to continue this year,” he said.”

Read the article here.

New York Times: Thousands of Indian Women Find Their American Dreams in Jeopardy

New York Times: Thousands of Indian Women Find Their American Dreams in Jeopardy

I was quoted in the April 6 New York Times article about visa backlogs for foreign nationals from India.

“No one should be stuck waiting more than 10 years for a green card. It hurts employers and employees and their families,” said Stephen Yale-Loehr, a professor of immigration law at Cornell Law School. “Indians are being held hostage by our broken immigration system.”

The article is here: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/06/us/indians-h1b-visas-trump-immigration-wives.html

China Daily: Spending bill likely to extend EB-5 program again

China Daily: Spending bill likely to extend EB-5 program again

I spoke with China Daily on March 21 discussing the possibility of an EB-5 extension in the coming week.

“It’s expected that Congress will approve another clean extension (meaning no changes) to the current EB-5 program until September 30,” Cornell University law professor Stephen Yale-Loehr said in an interview on Tuesday.

“The investment minimums for the program would have increased from $500,000 and $1 million to $925,000 and a little over $1 million,” said Yale-Loehr. He added that a job creation requirement also would have increased to nine (for $925,000) and 12 (for more than $1 million).

In the end, the prognosis for action (on EB-5) is slim to none. It’s hard to get Congress to do anything that is controversial, especially with the mid-term elections approaching.

The article, by Paul Welitzkin, can be accessed here: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201803/21/WS5ab267f5a3106e7dcc14547c.html